Forensic Psychology, Psychology

Do techniques for generating suspects contaminate procedures for identifying perpetrators?

First published on the Harm & Evidence Research Collaborative (HERC) website by Graham Pike and Jim Turner, The Open University. There is considerable evidence that mistaken identification by an eyewitness is the leading cause of miscarriages of justice. For example, research done by The Innocence Project, has found that eyewitness misidentification plays a role in more than 70% of overturned convictions… Continue reading Do techniques for generating suspects contaminate procedures for identifying perpetrators?

Forensic Psychology, Psychology

Badged OpenLearn Course: Forensic psychology

We're pleased to announce that the badged version of the OpenLearn course Forensic psychology is now live. Explore how your own mind works, and discover how the limitations of the human brain can lead to major miscarriages of justice. Despite advances in forensic science, eyewitness testimony remains a critical component of criminal investigations. Psychological research… Continue reading Badged OpenLearn Course: Forensic psychology

Forensic Psychology, Psychology

The own-race bias in eyewitness identification.

The own race bias is the phenomenon whereby individuals are better at recognising and differentiating between faces that are the same race as they are, and much poorer with faces of another race. The issue of the own-race bias has serious ramifications when it comes to eyewitness identification and when a witness is faced with… Continue reading The own-race bias in eyewitness identification.