CUSP, Psychology, Psychology in the world

Time for change?

Paul Stenner considers recent events in Bristol and calls for more psychological research into time, and its political significance. Time – as a psychological experience - has always been political, but in recent weeks it has become political in a way that almost nobody can ignore. Bristol is well known to have been built to… Continue reading Time for change?

A PhD in Psychology, CUSP, Psychology, Research in the School

They’re killing my participants!

Sue Nieland writes about an under-valued group of UK citizens, and the consequences of that undervaluing. I started my PhD last October with hope, excitement and some disbelief that, after so many years of collecting Masters degrees, I had the opportunity to join the elite group of postgraduate researchers within the OU. I knew it… Continue reading They’re killing my participants!

CUSP, Psychology, Psychology in the world

George Floyd: The Shameful Psychosocial Dynamics of ‘Race’, Violence and Hatred

Dr David Jones writes about the dynamics of shame, hatred and fear that have been repeatedly noted, yet still continue. The current global attention being brought to the problems of ‘race’ and criminal justice by the callous killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, prompts me to write as a white academic who has struggled to… Continue reading George Floyd: The Shameful Psychosocial Dynamics of ‘Race’, Violence and Hatred

CUSP, Psychology, Research in the School

With us or against us? New research directions

The Culture and Social Psychology group met online last week to discuss new research by two of its members. Karen Hagan presented her ongoing work on the ways that people assert dominance in discourse, including the practices that are commonly labelled as bullying. To explore this further, the group looked at a piece of transcript… Continue reading With us or against us? New research directions

CUSP, Psychology, Psychology in the world

The Psychology of Global Crises: A virtual conference

At the end of May, a new kind of academic event took place. The Psychology of Global Crises: State Surveillance, Solidarity and Everyday Life was a conference about events like the Covid-19 pandemic, organised to fit with the circumstances that the virus has imposed. Academics could not travel or meet in person, so they gathered online,… Continue reading The Psychology of Global Crises: A virtual conference